Adult Education Survey (trng_aes)

Reference Metadata in Euro SDMX Metadata Structure (ESMS)

Compiling agency: Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union


Eurostat metadata
Reference metadata
1. Contact
2. Metadata update
3. Statistical presentation
4.Unit of measure
5. Reference Period
6. Institutional Mandate
7. Confidentiality
8. Release policy
9. Frequency of dissemination
10. Dissemination format
11. Accessibility of documentation
12. Quality management
13. Relevance
14. Accuracy
15. Timeliness and punctuality
16. Comparability
17. Coherence
18. Cost and Burden
19. Data revision
20. Statistical processing
21. Comment
Related Metadata
Annexes (including footnotes)



For any question on data and metadata, please contact: EUROPEAN STATISTICAL DATA SUPPORT

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1. Contact Top
1.1. Contact organisation Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union
1.2. Contact organisation unit F5: Education, health and social protection
1.5. Contact mail address 2920 Luxembourg LUXEMBOURG


2. Metadata update Top
2.1. Metadata last certified 20/04/2011
2.2. Metadata last posted 26/09/2013
2.3. Metadata last update 19/02/2013


3. Statistical presentation Top
3.1. Data description

The Adult Education Survey (AES) is part of the EU Statistics on lifelong learning.

There has been two waves of data collection so far.

The first wave (pilot) of the survey - also named 2006 AES - has been carried out by countries in the EU, EFTA and candidate countries between 2005 and 2008: for the first time, it set up a common EU framework including standard questionnaire, tools and quality reporting.
The second wave, which is the most recent data collection also named 2011 AES, has been conducted by EU countries and EFTA countries between July 2011 and June 2012.

The first 2006 AES results were released in autumn 2008.
The first 2011 AES results have been released in February 2013: this new release comprise main indicators on participation in education and training (formal and non-formal learning) and main characteristics of learning activities.
A second set of indicators based on the 2011 AES will be released later on.

Both 2006 and 2011 results are now displayed within the same tables.

The whole survey covers participation in education and lifelong learning activities (formal, non-formal and informal learning) including job-related activities, characteristics of learning activities, self-reported skills as well as modules on social and cultural participation, foreign language skills, IT skills and background variables related to main characteristics of the respondents.

Parameters and main variables

The AES focused on the following parameters:

  • Participation in formal, non-formal and informal education (FED, NFE, INF)
  • Non-participation and obstacles to participation in training
  • Participation in FED, NFE and INF activities by field of education/learning
  • Share of the job related NFE
  • Volume of instruction hours in FED and NFE
  • Employer financing and costs of learning in FED and NFE
  • Module on language and ICT skills of the population
  • Module on social and cultural participation of the population
3.2. Classification system

The classification of education, occupation and economic activities in the Adult Education Survey are fully harmonised with the classifications used in other fields of the European system of statistics.

The classification of the economic activities is in accordance to NACE Rev.1.1 and occupations according to ISCO (http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/ramon/).

The classification of educational activities is based on ISCED - the International Standard Classification of Education - UNESCO 1997.

3.3. Coverage - sector

Not applicable

3.4. Statistical concepts and definitions

Lifelong learning: All learning activity undertaken throughout life, with the aim of improving knowledge, skills and competences, within a personal, civic, social, and employment related perspectives.

Learning activities: Any activities of an individual organised with the intention to improve his/her knowledge, skills, and competences. Intentional learning (as opposed to random learning) is defined as a deliberate search for knowledge, skills, competences, or attitudes of lasting value. Organised learning is defined as learning planned in a pattern or sequence with the explicit or implicit aims.

Formal education is defined as education provided in the system of schools, colleges, universities and other formal educational institutions that normally constitutes a continuous "ladder" of full-time education for children and young people, generally beginning at the age of five to seven and continuing to up to 20 or 25 years old.

Non Formal Education is defined as any organised and sustained educational activities that do not correspond exactly to the above definition of formal education. Non-formal education may therefore take place both within and outside educational institutions and cater to persons of all ages. Depending on country contexts, it may cover educational programmes to impart adult literacy, basic education for out of school children, life-skills, work-skills, and general culture.

Highest level of education successfully completed (educational attainment)

Highest level of educational attainment are aggregated to 3 levels:

- low corresponds pre-primary, primary and lower secondary education (ISCED levels 0, 1, 2)

- medium corresponds to upper secondary and post secondary non-tertiary education (ISCED levels 3 and 4)

- high corresponds to tertiary education (ISCED levels 5 and 6).

More information on ISCED97 is available on the Unesco site

 Degree of urbanisation

Three types of areas are defined based on population density:

- densely-populated (urban) with more than 500 habitants per square kilometer,

- semi-urban with between 100  and 500 habitants per square kilometer

- rural with less than 100 habitants per square kilometer.

Activity status : The activity status comprises employed, unemployed and inactive.

Economic activities

Economic activity, is in accordance with the section breakdown of the NACE Rev. 1.1, the Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community.

Occupation

Type of occupation is defined according to the International classification ISCO-88, 1-digit level. 4 categories of employees are distinguished (ISCO-88 codes in parenthesis):

- high skilled white collar (codes 1+2+3) that includes, legislators, senior officials and managers, professionals and technicians and associate professionals;

- low skilled white collar (4+5) that includes clerks and service workers and shop and market sales workers,

- high skilled blue collar (6+7) where includes skilled agricultural and fishery workers and craft and related trades workers;

- low skilled blue collar (8+9) where is included plant and machine operators and assemblers and elementary occupations.

3.5. Statistical unit

Individuals and learning activities

2006 AES

Sampling unit was individuals in Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia, United Kingdom while it was households in Bulgaria, Greece, Italy and dwellings in Poland.

2011 AES

This item will be updated later on.

3.6. Statistical population

The reference population is defined as people living in private households.
The target population is restricted to people aged 25 to 64.

The table below shows the target population and sample sizes for the 2006 AES.
Updates (with 2011 AES figures) will be made in the coming weeks.

Important note:

In the 2011 AES, the reference used to calculate the age of the individuals in Eurostat databases is the month and the year of interview. This can account for minor differencies when it comes to comparing national results published by national statistical authorities using the same 2011 AES sources.
Exception to this general rule applied by Eurostat: the age of individuals in the Polish data have been calculated with the fixed reference of December 2011.

Country

2006 AES Micro data

Population (average of 2006)

Code

Name

Sample size (RESPONSE)

Target population

Target population

Total population

Totals

169,183

234,641,457

251,394,379

397,207,283

AT

Austria

4,675

4,561,836

4,575,327

8,282,424

BE

Belgium

4 850

5 652 513

5,666,353

10,547,958

BG

Bulgaria

5,263

4,295,030

4,296,797

7,699,020

CY

Cyprus

4,810

422,466

416,996

772,549

CZ

Czech Republic

9,543

6 045 009

5,960,173

10269134

DE

Germany

6,407

45,227,984

45,096,036

82,376,451

EE

Estonia

3,585

705,974

706,354

1,343,547

ES

Spain

16,968

25,507,487

25,207,735

44,116,441

FI

Finland

4,144

2,849,791

2,851,172

5,266,268

FR

France

15,350

31,492578

33058904

63195457 

GR

Greece

6,510

6,050,927

6,176,115

11,148,460

HR

Croatia

3089

2 365 740

2406343

4442061

HU

Hungary

7,494

5,567,176

5,637,591

10,071,370

IT

Italy

27,848

32,657,194

32,884,557

58,941,499

LT

Lithuania

3,696

1,795,076

1,788,623

3,394,082

LV

Latvia

2,287

1,205,505

1,217,140

2,287,948

NL

Netherlands

3326

9,020,870

9,064,944

16,346,101

NO

Norway

3,018

2,510,364

2,489,800

4,660,677

PL

Poland

24,817

20,633,803

20,809,598

38,141,267

SE

Sweden

3,632

4,793,653

4,808,445

9,080,505

SI

Slovenia

4,192

1,162,228

1,150,004

2,006,868

SK

Slovakia

5,001

3,040,871

3,023,737

5,391,409

UK

United Kingdom

3,528

31,140,644

32,101635

60,621,244

CH

Switzerland

*

*

4202984

7483934

DK

Denmark

*

*

2981044

5437272

MT

Malta

*

*

223512

406408

PT

Portugal

*

*

5844772

10584344

RO

Romania

*

*

11792424

21,587,666

TR

Turkey

*

*

No data

71104615

Source: population data taken from the Eurostat demographic database.

3.7. Reference area

2006 AES

Not all EU Member States countries took part in the first wave of the survey (no survey in Ireland and Luxembourg). Still EU aggregates have been calculated.

2011 AES

The survey was run in every Eu Member State and in EFTA countries except Iceland and Liechtenstein.

Not all national datasets are available yet.

As a consequence, EU aggregates have not been calculated so far.
They will be displayed later on in the coming months, in parallel to the updates with new national data.

 

3.8. Coverage - Time

The 2006 AES surveys were carried out during the period 2005 to 2008.

The 2011 AES surveys were run between July 2011 and June 2012.

3.9. Base period

Not applicable


4. Unit of measure Top

Not applicable

 


5. Reference Period Top

2006 AES

The data are presented with a common reference year (2007) although the reference period varies from country to country.

COUNTRY

Interviewing periods

AUSTRIA

04/2006-11/2007

BELGIUM

02/2007-06/2008

BULGARIA

11/2006-12/2007

CROATIA

12/2006-12/2007

CYPRUS

09/2005 -12/2006

CZECH REPUBLIC

01/2007- 03/2008

ESTONIA

10/2006 -12/2007

FINLAND

03/2005 - 08/2006

FRANCE

01/2006 -01/2007*

GERMANY

03/2006 - 07/2007

GREECE

10/2006 - 12/2007

HUNGARY

06/2005 - 08/2006

ITALY

05/2005 - 08/2006

LATVIA

05/2006 - 06/2007

LITHUANIA

03/2005 - 04/2006

NETHERLANDS

02/2007-04/2008**

NORWAY

05/2006 - 08/2007

POLAND

10/2005 - 12/2006

SLOVAKIA

08/2006 - 09/2007

SLOVENIA

09/2006-12/2007

SPAIN

02/2006-04/2007

SWEDEN

10/2004 - 03/2006

UNITED KINGDOM

10/2004-02/2006

 *  The reference period for the learning activities is the year preceding the survey.
** Information on the formal learning activities was obtained from LFS data. This implies that the reference period for formal education is 4 weeks prior to the interview. The reference period of the non-formal and informal learning activities was the last 12 months before the interview.

2011 AES

As set by the Commission regulation regarding the AES data collection, the reference period for the learning activities is the last 12 months before the interview.

A table displaying the interviewing periods for the 2011 AES will be posted here later on.

 


6. Institutional Mandate Top
6.1. Institutional Mandate - legal acts and other agreements

'Regulation (EC) No 452/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2008 concerning the production and development of statistics on education and lifelong learning' domain 2 Council Regulation (EC) No 452/2008

'Commission Regulation (EU) No 823/2010 of 17 September 2010 implementing Regulation No 452/2008' Commission Regulation (EU) No 823/2010

See also Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98 of 9 March 1998 on the organisation of a labour Force sample survey.

6.2. Institutional Mandate - data sharing

Not available


7. Confidentiality Top
7.1. Confidentiality - policy

Regulation (EC) No 223/2009 on European statistics (recital 24 and Article 20(4)) of 11 March 2009 (OJ L 87, p. 164), stipulates the need to establish common principles and guidelines ensuring the confidentiality of data used for the production of European statistics and the access to those confidential data with due account for technical developments and the requirements of users in a democratic society.

7.2. Confidentiality - data treatment

If the  number of observations < 20 or the percentage of non-response > 50% then data not be published. If the number of observations is between 20 and 50 or the percentage of non-response between 20% and 50%, data will be published with warning on high non response.


8. Release policy Top
8.1. Release calendar

There is no specific release calendar.
An update including new 2011 AES national results and EU aggregates will be posted later in the year.

The last release date can be seen on Eurostat website.

8.2. Release calendar access

Not applicable

8.3. Release policy - user access

In line with the Community legal framework and the European Statistics Code of Practice Eurostat disseminates European statistics on Eurostat's website (see item 10 - 'Dissemination format') respecting professional independence and in an objective, professional and transparent manner in which all users are treated equitably. The detailed arrangements are governed by the Eurostat protocol on impartial access to Eurostat data for users.


9. Frequency of dissemination Top

Adult Education surveys are run every 5 years (please see Council Regulation (EC) No 452/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2008 concerning the production and development of statistics on education and lifelong learning' domain 2).

 

The results of each wave of the survey are published as soon as a sufficient number of national datasets are available.


10. Dissemination format Top
10.1. Dissemination format - News release

None

10.2. Dissemination format - Publications

None

10.3. Dissemination format - online database

A set of tables can be found on Eurostat DATABASE
(See the "Education and Training" domain of the navigation tree)

10.4. Dissemination format - microdata access

The 2006 AES microdata are accessible for researchers
(see the microdata access page on Eurostat website)

The 2011 AES microdata will be accessible later on in 2013.

 

10.5. Dissemination format - other

-


11. Accessibility of documentation Top
11.1. Documentation on methodology

Documentation of national methodolgies as well as national evaluations of the quality are available on the corresponding CIRCA BC domain.

Available information on methodology include:

  • Country Profiles from participating countries
  • Final questionnaires
  • Summary of country profiles
  • Quality reports from participating countries
  • Summary and evaluation of quality reports
  • Revision and review of data quality
  • Other sources of information including Task Force and Working group papers on several methodological topics

More information and documents are available on CIRCA BC.

11.2. Quality management - documentation

National quality reports and an EU quality report are available on the corresponding CIRCA BC domain.


12. Quality management Top
12.1. Quality assurance

A set of qualtity criteria have been set up within the Commission Regulation No 823/2010.
Please refer to the annexes of the Commission regulation for further information.

12.2. Quality management - assessment

National quality reports provide users with basic information on quality at national level.
Please refer to the corresponding CIRCA BC domain.


13. Relevance Top
13.1. Relevance - User Needs

Not available

13.2. Relevance - User Satisfaction

Not available

13.3. Completeness

Not available


14. Accuracy Top
14.1. Accuracy - overall

Not available

14.2. Sampling error

2006 AES

The following Table  provides the estimates and confidence limits for participation rates in formal, non-formal and informal education for some countries regarding the 2006 AES.

The intervals calculated in the table are calculated on the basis of the AES microdata provided to Eurostat (assumption simple random sample) and are therefore not taken from the quality reports.

Confidence limits1)  for participation in AES survey:

Country

Participation rate (%)

Formal education

Non-formal education

Informal education

Austria

4.2 ± 0.6

39.4 ± 1.4

75.7 ± 1.2

Belgium

12.5 ± 0.9

33.5 ± 1.3

34.9 ± 1.3

Bulgaria

2.7 ± 0.4

35.2 ± 1.3

28.0 ± 1.2

Cyprus

2.9 ± 0.5

39.5 ± 1.4

63.6 ± 1.4

Czech Republic

3.9 ± 0.4

35.3 ± 1.0

54.7 ± 1.0

Estonia

5.0 ± 0.7

40.2 ± 1.6

44.8 ± 1.6

Spain

5.9 ± 0.4

27.2 ± 0.7

28.0 ± 0.7

Finland

10.2 ± 0.9

51.2 ± 1.5

54.6 ± 1.5

France

1.7 ± 0.2

34.1 ± 0.7

63.8 ± 0.8

Germany

5.2 ± 0.5

43.1 ± 1.2

52.4 ± 1.2

Greece

2.3 ± 0.4

12.7 ± 0.8

20.7 ± 1.0

Croatia

4.5 ± 0.7

18.4 ± 1.4

44.6 ± 1.8

Hungary

2.5 ± 0.4

6.8 ± 0.6

26.2 ± 1.0

Italy

4.4 ± 0.2

20.2 ± 0.5

41.2 ± 0.6

Lithuania

6.3 ± 0.8

30.9 ± 1.5

45.3 ± 1.6

Latvia

5.4 ± 0.9

30.7 ± 1.9

53.9 ± 2.0

Netherlands

6.8 ± 0.9

42.1 ± 1.7

           _ 2) 

Norway

9.9 ± 1.1

50.6 ± 1.8

72.3 ± 1.6

Poland

5.5 ± 0.3

18.6 ± 0.5

25.4 ± 0.5

Sweden

12.7 ± 1.1

69.4 ± 1.5

76.0 ± 1.4

Slovenia

8.7 ± 0.9

36.1 ± 1.5

62.0 ± 1.5

Slovakia

6.1 ± 0.7

41.2 ± 1.4

84.1 ± 1.0

UK

15.1 ± 1.2

40.3 ± 1.6

53.7 ± 1.6

1) The confidence limits at 95% level of significance.

2) Netherlands used some new variables for informal learning, which were totally different from those suggested in the Model Questionnaire

Note: Participation rates are calculated from microdata sent to Eurostat.

2011 AES

The overall EU 2011 AES data collection has not been evaluated so far.
The outcomes on the national quality reports will be summarised later on in the year and this item will be updated accordingly.

14.3. Non-sampling error

2006 AES

Measurement errors

For most countries the 2006 AES was a stand-alone survey. French, Hungarian and The Netherlands surveys were ad hoc modules of Labour force survey. Italy carried out the AES as part of "Citizens and their leisure survey".   Recommended method for collecting the data was CAPI that was finally applied by Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France and Germany. PAPI with face-to-face interview was the most used method in Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia. Mixed version of CAPI and CATI as survey method was reported by Norway and Sweden.   Countries reported several issues in their quality reports which complement the interpretation of data:

  • Survey design -some countries considered the questionnaire to be long and with some sensitive questions. The average interview time varies from country but was in general between 30 and 60 minutes.
  • General information - Older respondents were not always able to answer questions on parental education and occupation.
  • Participation in FED and NFE - Some respondents had difficulties with determination of the number of hours spent on travelling and learning at home and also the number of instruction hours for the NFE activity.

In part of the quality reports regarding the implementation of Classification of Learning Activities (CLA), countries described their experience and cases where they had difficulties. Proxy interviews were allowed in three countries. In Greece the overall proxy rate was 22.9%, in Italy 10% and in Poland it was 15.6%. 

2011 AES

The overall EU 2011 AES data collection has not been evaluated so far.
The outcomes on the national quality reports will be summarised later on in the year and this item will be updated accordingly.


15. Timeliness and punctuality Top
15.1. Timeliness

2006 AES

The following table give an overview of all national calendars regarding the implementation od the survey from pilot testing to microdata delivery to Eurostat:

Country

Pilot testing

Fieldwork

Processing

Data delivery to Eurostat

Austria

02-03/2007

04-11/2007

12/2007-05/2008

07/2008

Belgium

10-11/2007

02/2008-06/2008

05/2008-10/2008

01/2009

Bulgaria

05/2007

11-12/2007

02-05/2008

05-06/2008

Croatia

10/2007

12/2007

01/2008-10/2008

11/2008

Cyprus

11-12/2005

09/2006-12/2006

09/2006-06/2007

07/2007

Czech Republic

10/2007

1/2008 -3/2008

04/2008-07/2008

07/2008

Estonia

10-11/2006

09/2007-12/2007

01/2008-04/2008

22/04/2008

Finland

06/2005

03/2006-08/2006

04/2006-07/2007

31/05/2007

France

06-10/2005

01/2006-01/2007

02/2007-02/2008

02/2008

Germany

01/2007

03/2007-07/2007

07/2007-04/2008

09/04/2008

Greece

03/2007

10/2007-12/2007

10/2007-02/2008

21/02/2008

Hungary

04-05/2006

07/2006-09/2006

10/2006-05/2007

05/2007

Italy

no pilot testing

05/2006-08/2006

09/2006-07/2007

07/2007

Latvia

02-03/2007

05/2007-06/2007

07/2007-08/2007

30/08/2007

Lithuania

no pilot testing

03/2006-04/2006

05/2006-10/2006

10/11/2006

Netherlands

N.A

02/2008-04/2008

05/2008-08/2008

03/2009

Norway

02-03/2007

05/2007-08/2007

07/2007-11/2007

03/2008

Poland

05/2006

10/2006-12/2006

10/2006-05/2007

12/07/2007

Slovakia

02-03/2007

08/2007-09/2007

10/2007-12/2007

12/2007

Slovenia

10/2006

09/2007-12/2007

January - may 2008 (planned)  realized  January 2009

06/2009

Spain

03/2006

02/2007-04/2007

06/2007-10/2007

11-12/2007

Sweden

05/2005

10/2005-03/2006

01/2006-12/2006

01/2007

UK

08/2005

10/2005 - 02/2006

12/2005 - 04/2006

07/2008

2011 AES

This item will be updated with an equivalent table for the 2011 AES data collection.

15.2. Punctuality

Not available


16. Comparability Top
16.1. Comparability - geographical

Not available

16.2. Comparability - over time

Breaks in series between 2006 AES and 2011 AES

In some countries, the 2006 AES and 2011 AES results cannot be used to draw a comparison nor to describe the evolution of the situation on lifelong learning between 2006 and 2011 due to important methodoligical changes. 

At the time of the release date (February 2013), the following list is not exhaustive.
It might be completed later on.

France
The main changes responsible for this break are:
- a change in the questionnaire and
- a change in the way of collecting the data.

Hungary
The main changes are the following:
- The 2011 AES is a standalone survey, whereas the 2006 AES was an ad-hoc module of Labour Force Survey.
- Furthermore, the 2006 survey outcomes showed that some non-formal programs were not listed within the survey questionnaire. It has been decided to include them in the 2011 AES data collection, which accounts for an increase on participation in non-formal learning.


17. Coherence Top
17.1. Coherence - cross domain

Results from the Adult Education Survey are not directly comparable with variables on lifelong learning coming from the EU Labour Force Survey data (quarterly data where the lifelong learning variable has a reference period of 4 weeks.)

The EU-LFS ad-hoc module on lifelong learning as carried out in 2003 is not directly comparable with the AES information in terms of survey methodology.

More information and documents are available in CIRCA.

17.2. Coherence - internal

Eurostat carried out quality tests, mainly on the coherency of the provided information.


18. Cost and Burden Top

Not available


19. Data revision Top
19.1. Data revision - policy

Eurostat publishes the most up-to-date information available at EU-level based on the most up-to-date national microdata available and recalculates the EU aggregates whenever a national dataset has been changed.

19.2. Data revision - practice

National updates can be made by countries.

The results and methods as used in the Adult Education Survey are in principle open to revision, in particular when new or improved information becomes available.

Documentation of methods or changes can be found in the corresponding public domain on CIRCA BC on the Eurostat homepage.


20. Statistical processing Top
20.1. Source data

Adult Education Survey (AES)

20.2. Frequency of data collection

Every 5 years.

20.3. Data collection

Data collection methods were designed in collaboration with the participating countries and Eurostat through the work of the AES Task Force and other Working groups including in collaboration with external contractors.

For both 2006 AES and 2011 AES, many reference documents have been set up (manual, standard questionnaire...) as well as a common technique for conducting the interviews.

2006 AES

Base used for the sample

Countries used different bases for selecting the AES sample

Census: Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Cyprus, France, Greece and Hungary

Register: Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden

Postcode address file: U.K

More specifically:

Austria:
Central Register of Residents

Belgium
National Register

Bulgaria
Population Census 2001 Register

Croatia
The basis for the sampling frame is the Data Base of individual data collected during the Census 2001

Czech Republic
Czech census enumeration unit register

Cyprus:
2001 census of population and Electricity Authority of Cyprus.

Estonia
The Population Register 

Finland
Population database maintained by Statistics Finland

France
Census

Germany
The population register

Greece
2001 census

Hungary
2001 Population and Housing Census

Italy
Public register of households

Latvia
Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia (CSB) Address Register

Lithuania
The Population Register

Netherlands
Municipal basic registration of population data

Norway
Central Population Register

Poland
Register of Domestic Territorial Division

Slovakia
Slovak total population, state to 31st December 2005

Slovenia
Central Population Register

Spain
Spain Official Population Register

Sweden
Swedish total population register (TPR)

SAMPLING Depending on the national framework, countries used the following sampling methods:  

  1. multi-stage multi-stratified sampling - Germany, Italy, Latvia, Norway and Poland
  2. stratified simple random sampling - Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom
  3. simple random sampling - Latvia, Slovakia
  4. multistage stratified sampling within LFS - France, Greece, Hungary

Survey design and interviewing methods

Face to face interviews. CAPI interviews were recommended but some countries used other methods.

Differences between national survey design and AES recommendations were reported by several countries. Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia used for data collection the face-to-face interviews with PAPI questionnaire as an interviewing method instead of recommended CAPI. Norway and Sweden collected AES data by mixed CATI and CAPI method.

The AES in France included a lot of open coded variables (post-coding subsequently).

Calculation of the weighting factors

All the countries used data on gender and age in the weighting process. As calibration variables were also used place of residence (rural/urban area), region according to NUTS II level, education level (Finland) and employment status (France).

2011 AES

 

Participation of adults in lifelong learning

 

 1. Aim

 

The aim of this survey shall be to provide comparable data on participation and non-participation of adults in lifelong learning.

 

 2. Scope

 

The statistical unit shall be the individual, covering at least the population age range of 25-64 years. In the case of the collection of information through a survey, proxy answers shall be avoided, wherever possible.

 

 3. Subjects covered

 

Subjects covered by the survey shall be:

 

(a) participation and non-participation in learning activities;

 

(b) characteristics of these learning activities;

 

(c) information on self-reported skills;

 

(d) socio-demographic information.

 

Data on participation in social and cultural activities shall also be collected on a voluntary basis as explanatory variables useful for further analysis of the participants and non-participants’ profiles.

 

 4. Data sources and sample size

 

The data source shall be a sample survey. Administrative data sources may be used to reduce the burden on respondents. Sample size shall be established on the basis of precision requirements that shall not require effective national sample sizes to be larger than 5 000 individuals, calculated on the assumption of simple random sampling. Within these limits, specific subpopulations shall require particular sampling considerations.

 

 5. Periodicity

 

Data shall be collected every five years. The first year of implementation shall be 2010, at the earliest.

 

 Sample and precision requirements

 

1. According to the Annex to Regulation (EC) No 452/2008, the Adult Education Survey ‘sample size shall be established on the basis of precision requirements that shall not require effective national sample sizes to be larger than 5 000 individuals, calculated on the assumption of simple random sampling. Within these limits, specific subpopulations shall require particular sampling considerations’.

 

2. The net sample (excluding unit non-response) should provide estimates within a 95 % confidence interval for a set of indicators listed in paragraph 3. The half-length of the confidence interval for each indicator shall not exceed the threshold provided in paragraph 3 unless an effective sample size larger than 5 000 individuals is required at national level.

 

3. The indicators of interest and the maximum half-length of the 95 % confidence interval are: Indicator

 

Maximum half-length of the 95 % confidence interval

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training 1,4 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training (males) 2,0 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training (females) 2,0 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training (persons aged 25-34) 3,0 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training (persons aged 35-54) 2,0 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training (persons aged 55-64) 3,2 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training by highly educated persons (ISCED level 5-6) 4,0 %

 

Participation rate (%) in non-formal education and training by unemployed persons 11,5 %

 

Share of job-related activities among non-formal training activities 4,0 %

 

For countries with a population aged 25-64 of one million to three and a half millions, the thresholds provided in the column ‘maximum half-length of the 95 % confidence interval’ shall be increased by 20 %.

 

For countries with a population aged 25-64 of less than one million, the thresholds provided in the column ‘maximum half-length of the 95 % confidence interval’ shall be increased by 40 %.

 

4. These requirements refer to a sample of resident units aged 25-64. National samples with a wider scope should allow for the provision of estimates for the resident population aged 25-64 complying with the precision requirements set out in paragraphs 2 and 3.EN 18.9.2010 Official Journal of the European Union L 246/69

 

20.4. Data validation

Data validation is done by National Statistical Institutes or other Statistical authorities that are responsible for the survey.

Eurostat carried out quality tests, mainly on the coherency of the provided information.

Validation level 1

20.5. Data compilation

Eurostat holds a European dataset being a compilation of all national datasets available.

20.6. Adjustment

Data published online are updated whenever a country sends any kind of revision to Eurostat.


21. Comment Top

2006 AES

Countries reported several problematic modules and variables issues mostly concerning the following topics:

Background information

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Parental education

Hungary, Spain,

Citizenship

Latvia,

Formal Education 

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Number of instruction hours in formal education

Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Latvia, Poland, Slovenia

Level of formal education

Belgium

Cost of formal education activities

Belgium

Distinguishing costs of exam fees, tuition etc. from the cost of books, technical study means etc

Norway

 Non-formal education 

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Number of instruction hours in non-formal education

Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Finland, Latvia, Poland, Spain, Slovenia

Certificate of a non-formal activity in education and training

Austria, Cyprus

Number of non-formal education activities

Greece

Distinguish between guided on the job training and learning from a colleague.

Latvia, Lithuania

Field of the third randomly selected activity

Sweden

guided on-the-job training from other forms of planned learning activities at work:

Norway,

separating guided on-the-job training from random learning at work

Norway

Type of non-formal education activities

Greece

Cost of non-formal education activities

Belgium

Number of travel hours

Bulgaria, Latvia, Poland, Spain

Number of time spent at home

Poland, Spain

Number of homework hours

Bulgaria, Latvia

Provider of non-formal education activity

Cyprus, The Netherlands

difficulty remembering self-study time

Lithuania

Distinguishing costs of exam fees, tuition etc. from the cost of books, technical study means etc

Norway

Informal education 

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Informal learning

Finland, Spain, Sweden

 Modules 

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Obstacles in participation in education

Austria, Finland, Hungary, Italy, Slovakia, Cyprus

Use of ICT:

Austria

Language skills

Norway

Level  of knowledge of foreign languages

 

Poland

Level of computer use (literacy)

Poland,

Attitudes towards learning

Spain, Hungary

 Others 

Problematic modules and/or questions

Country

Fields of education and training (post-coding):    

Austria,

Long and complex questionnaire

Austria , Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech republic, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden

Long reference period:

(remembering problems)

Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech republic, The Netherlands, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden

the distinction between formal, non-formal and informal learning (definition)

Belgium

face-to-face method of interviewing

Croatia

The implementation in a PAPI survey

 

Italy

Post coding of the ISCO/NACE/ISCED

Cyprus

Distinguishing between non-formal and informal learning

Latvia

 

PAPI questionnaire (The choice of learning activities i.e. three out of ten)

The Netherlands

field of education or training

Norway

Coding with alphanumeric codes

Slovakia

Duration of interview

Spain

Access to information about learning possibilities

Spain

 
2011 AES

This item will be updated later on.


Related metadata Top


Annexes Top